Cancer patient shares heartfelt message after publicly shamed for handicap parking

Cancer patient shares heartfelt message after publicly shamed for handicap parking

Handicapped parking spaces are for people who need them. However, one college student suffering cancer was publicly shamed just because she doesn’t appear to be handicapped.

In October 2017, Lexi Baskin, a student at University of Kentucky, returned to her car with her friend to find her Jeep covered in signs with harsh messages on them.

“There are legit handicapped people who need this parking space. We have seen you and your friend come and go and there is nothing handicapped about either of you. Your tag must be borrowed or fake. We will make every effort to see you fined or towed for being such a selfish, terrible person,” said one message.

But Baskin was legally allowed to use the parking spot. She was undergoing radiation treatment for a cancer in her brain stem. As the treatment caused her to feel extremely tired and sometimes dizzy, her doctor gave her a parking placard to help with her daily commute.

Seeing the criticisms, Baskin wrote a frustrated post on her Facebook page.

“Just a gentle reminder that you have no idea what is going on in other people’s lives,” she wrote. “Just because you can’t physically observe something does not mean that a person is not feeling it. Just because I look fine in the 2 minutes I walk from my car to the building does not mean I am not battling cancer and undergoing radiation treatment.”

Baskin wrote that she was not looking for sympathy but for people to be aware that everyone is “fighting their own battles.”

She concluded her post with a message: “Be kind to people. Make people cry tears of joy, and not frustration or sadness. Love one another. I will choose to love this person and pray for them. I hope that the darkness in their heart is replaced with unconditional love and happiness.”

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